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Our responsibility to help is also a responsibility to do it right.

Written by Jon Tolley
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Originally published
April 23 2020,
updated
August 5 2020

I think one of the things people are finding the hardest about the coronavirus pandemic is the lack of control we all have. Our health, income, work even what we can do for recreation, has been taken out of our hands. People are suffering on all of these fronts and, for the vast majority of us, there is nothing we can do. Except follow the government advice and stay at home.

Instead, it’s falling on specific groups of people to step up and help. They have the incredible responsibility of caring for the sick and vulnerable – and of keeping society functioning.

My wife is one of those people. She’s a critical care practitioner in an NHS intensive care unit. And, I couldn’t be prouder of her and her colleagues – or more thankful.

So, when she came home one day in March saying how she had found herself having to work without the necessary PPE, I knew I had found my way of making a difference. Within 24 hours the Prime team had developed a PPE full-face visor, that got the approval of NHS staff.

 

But doing something isn’t enough.

There’s a flip side to having a responsibility to try and help in a time of crisis though, and that is the responsibility of making sure you are doing it correctly.

The stories of people taking advantage of the pandemic to scam people or to make a tidy profit are sickening. Even those who genuinely want to help, need to make sure they aren’t risking people’s health and safety. Particularly when it comes to something as crucial as PPE, there is no room for lack of quality or cheap materials.

That’s why the UK National Standards Body, BSI, exists. They set the standards to say what is safe. To help businesses who can adapt and create products that are urgently needed during this pandemic, they compiled a list of standards they can access to ensure what is made is fit for purpose. We’re proud to say our PPE full face visors have been accredited with this standard and you can see the certification here

Worryingly, reports of products being sold with fake PPE certificates are beginning to increase. It makes you despair at the lengths people will go to, especially at a time when everyone else is trying to club together and do what they can.

 

So, if you need to buy PPE, or any other health technology, make sure it has the relevant certification. The BSI explains how you can check on their website, which you can find here.

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